Thursday, August 04, 2011

The Writing Is On The Wall : Part 2

CLICK TO ENLARGE AND (POSSIBLY) READ

22 comments:

  1. I dunno... your handwriting is rather legible. And I have to disagree with "Disadvantage #4." Pencils have erasers and pens have white-out (or correctional fluid, whatever you call it).

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  2. Legible and soooooo straight!!

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  3. Rosie : There were virtual lines on the virtual page.
    Jeffscape : Yeh but the only choices are to have it or not have it : you can't change, move, capitalise, or italicise it.

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  4. ha...you did well...i can read it...mine fluxes between readable and well...otherwise...funny...and i think you intentioanlly misspelled spell chicken...

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  5. I don't know, Alan, I used to do newsletters and catalogs by hand and have them printed in the thousands.

    I sometimes had to do a page over because I made a mistake.

    I also found that it forced me to use fewer words than when I type and I had to have a small pocket dictionary on the desk as I wrote.

    I have whole books written by hand and some were instruction books.

    You can go back in time to handwriting before the men who made computing possible and find books that were handwritten about everything from deeds to property in London (I have one for a large area of London and it is a legal document handwritten on parchment) to whole Bibles and Books of Hours only the scribes who wrote them could read properly.

    Writing was then a big deal like Bill Gates is now with Microsoft. Italy and the Italian compressed styles that replaced Merchantile scripts, called, Italic, were the new style every country employed scribes to learn and master. All modern handwriting, and scribblings, emerged.

    What you did on your notebook paper or ruled paper is still called. "Printing," and is the substitute for typewriting the name of the person who signs documents like letters with a signature nobody can read. Thus the title block was born to identify the correspondent.

    I hasten to add that I was able to read every letter of your missal and found it more entertaining than typed words.

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  6. Abe : Thanks for such a detailed - and interesting - comment Abe.

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  7. Yay! Well-done, despite the limitations. Now we know the real you. :)

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  8. Between my vision and your writing, I'm afraid I didn't glean much from the exercise. I did laugh at the "surgical probe" though. And the piccie is nice.

    Kat

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  9. Oh and what about writer’s cramp?

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  10. Handwriting analysts would have great fun deciphering the hills and dales of your (and others) handwriting, whereas the only thing that could be ascertained from typed text would be the make of machine and how many clogged up or worn letters there were. Not much fun there, then!

    Thanks for your nice comment on my shopping expedition report.

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  11. Well, it's readable and enjoyable. But it takes longer to read as well as to write, I fear. Wainwright's hand-written and drawn Lakes Guides seem even more of an achievement after your experiment.

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  12. Well, I liked it. My own handwriting varies from day to day, especially depending on how much coffee I've had.

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  13. Good work, Alan. I especially like the layout, with the offset box containing the advantages and disadvantages. I have enough problem just writing things on the page; adding images and text boxes is way out of my league. I'm spoiled; I've been using desktop publishing programs to make newsletters since the 80s and the Apple II.

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  14. There are still a few authors who write in longhand -- but not me! I'm totally spoiled by the ease of computer composition. When I do write long hand, it takes ages for me to decipher it.

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  15. What can I say...you are clever and hilarious. I'm with you...who wants to go back to White Out? Ugh.
    Love the pic of you and the GLW. :)

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  16. I like it! Formatting is so much easier with a pen, plus it adds a certain uniqueness to the posts. Also you can make posts away from home and then scan them when you get back.

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  17. Actually, if you have an Android phone, you can photo your posts on the fly and upload them from wherever as pdfs.

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  18. Fascinating experiment, Alan, and really quite refreshing to read a handwritten post.

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  19. Just had a play with the Android app for Blogger. Seems to work OK, which means I can post on the fly - or fly-post.

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  20. I think you have very nice handwriting, then that comes from a cacky handed backhander!

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  21. Alan, I meant that the letters were so straight up and down....

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  22. I like this unusual method of blogging, and your writing is perfectly legible :-) Mine used to be quite neat but now varies according to the time/effort allocated!

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