Tuesday, March 20, 2012

One Pin, Two Views 2 : Stone and Smoke


Much of the village of Thornton is constructed along the side of a valley. When the settlement reaches the top of the valley-side it contents itself with sending thread-like filaments out into the green of the rain-rich fields. These stone terraces thrust out into the countryside and then seem to almost lose interest.


The second photograph is merely an enlargement of part of the first photograph. Look at the chimney-pots. These houses received no shelter from the valley, their little rooms were under constant attack by a wind that was being funneled down from the Arctic tundra. But they were built near seams of coal which delivered heat to the rooms and smoke to the atmosphere.

Stone and smoke and mucky washing hanging out on a line. 
Thornton.

This is the second part of a short series in which two photographers - myself and Jennyfreckles - examine the same village from different perspectives. To see Jenny's second photograph in the series go over to her blog : SALT AND LIGHT.

22 comments:

  1. Hello Alan:
    This all looks so very Northern. The plethora of chimney pots heralding coal fires and the resulting soot which blackens the stone. So very atmospheric.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good northern smoke and grit

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm somehow reminded of the film, 'Kes'.

    ReplyDelete
  4. You have such skill with words Alan .... 'thrust out... and then seem to almost lose interest' describes exactly the sense I had too, though I would never have been able to find words to pin the feeling down. And once again your photo gives a good feel of the place's spirit.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Alan .. the changes in each house reflects different eras .. the open windows, the old fashioned style square paned ones - while the cottage at the end is obviously in urgent need of some modernisation. I prefer the sash windows on the 2nd in house from one on the end - the house looks asthetically better.

    Are you really saying the coal seam underground warms the earth ... I know the coal tips in South Africa often combustibly caught fire? Can only think of those freezing windy blustery wet days .. and the damp interiors ... and I'd rather not.

    Cheers - both takes so different once again .. Hilary

    ReplyDelete
  6. "Stone and smoke and mucky washing hanging out on a line." Hmmmmm... That line actually describes what I see in my mind whenever I think of Manchester. Heh, heh! I may have watched too many music videos from Throbbing Gristle, Cabaret Voltaire, and the early Human League.

    ReplyDelete
  7. UPVC windows? A necessity, I suppose, in those climes.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow. Impressive to say the least. √

    Since I was hacked I had to give up my old user name and the blogs that went with it. So this is the new birds blog and I hope you can come visit. Birds Birds Birds and Birds

    ReplyDelete
  9. you and jenny in collaboration. Two of my favorite blog friends! :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. It all looks a wee bit bleak Alan, and the way you describe it makes it sound pretty chilly. We're in Madrid today and I'm missing the sunshine of home so I guess Thornton wouldn't do for me.

    ReplyDelete
  11. They've seen a lot of life (and death).

    ReplyDelete
  12. Very interesting to see how your two different takes on the same place. I will admit this Thornton does look bleak and cold and well...dirty to me, like a thousand years of black smoke painted the bricks.

    ReplyDelete
  13. It doesn't look like a place I would care to visit from this viewpoint. However, I wouldn't mind seeing the Bronte's house.

    ReplyDelete
  14. They certainly don't look inviting places to live. If the town had room to crawl into the countryside I wonder why they didn't build detached houses with a garden rather than been all squashed together. The comparison of yours and jenny's is interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  15. That collection of chimney pots is really something. Quite unusual and I love the way the houses are grouped as well. Really worth enlarging up to get a better look.

    ReplyDelete
  16. The field is so green..almost hurts my eyes:)

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi, Alan. I am appearing here today by following Jenny's link. It is an interesting exercise the two of you are sharing. So often I find myself thinking "the shot I am taking is really the only way to take a shot here," then I see what someone else has done and it is entirely different. How great that we all have different minds and eyes. It will be fun to see what Jenny and you do this week.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I love this collaboration. I can just imagine hunkering down in that building with the cold wind whistling outside. The soot is something I'd rather not imagine.

    ReplyDelete
  19. It does look a bit grim. You need to be hardy to live up there (either that, or sprint between the centrally heated home, the rapidly heating car and the centrally heated workplace).

    ReplyDelete
  20. Came to you from Jennyfreckles. You could take those old houses and lift them bodily and stick them down in the middle of Liverpool and you'd never know the difference. I lived in Flamborough and Bridlington for about 10 years and never got to know much about West Yorkshire. Went to college in the Peak District too, so just skipped over your area. I find it all fascinating

    ReplyDelete
  21. Great houses and great roofs!

    ReplyDelete