Wednesday, August 12, 2009

A Postcard To Miss Chambers

Somebody started this thing about doing a post in our own handwriting so I thought I would follow up on yesterday's post with a postcard to Miss Chambers. Hopefully, if you click on the written side the image should enlarge (if not I will add the text as the first comment).

13 comments:

  1. Alan, quite nice of you to do this for Miss Chamberes, wot? Your hand-writing's a mite better than mine-LOL! Your's I can read, yes!

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  2. I like to idea of writing to someone in the long distant past. May take it up as a blog theme - say Napoleon or Cromwell.

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  3. Subby : It's just this continuing thing I have and can't get rid of - about updating people who have dies long ago. Like they do at the end of some films where they list in a sentence or two what happened to all the people following the end of the story. I'd love to know what happened to Miss Chambers. Perhaps I will write her life story in which case I will just have to make it up.
    Bill : Be my guest. I will be fascinated to see what you come up with.

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  4. Alan, you've some clews at hand( especially the time frame )...kind of like the idea but not sure who I'd like to write to first( scratching head in thought )...

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  5. Love the thoughtful choice of postcard and your explanations. Miss Chambers is now more up to speed on the 21st Century than she was before. Or probably she has reincarnated and is living next door to you... :o)

    Love the handwriting too - puts me off creating a handwritten post!!!

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  6. Miss Chambers is going to love it!

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  7. Very cool post! I'm with subtorp--your handwriting's way more legible than mine.

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  8. I LOVE to research the names I find in vintage books and emphemera, etc. It's a thrilling hunt back in time. There's so much info available online now. It's just too much fun!

    You've got some very artsy printing going on here, Alan.

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  9. I am fascinated by all of this. When I was very young, the mail traveled by train and was sorted on the train. So a person could send a postcard to the neighboring town, 14 miles or so, the train would catch it by a hook as it went through town, and if the mailman was any good, he would sort it before it got to that town and it would be delivered in 20 minutes. They literally threw the mail bag on the ground as they went by. Phones were just starting to be added but this was fast communication. You just reminded me that I have a few of those somewhere in all my parents things.

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  10. Kabbalah : Yes I was quite proud of finding a suitable postcard to use.
    Willow : I absolutely agree about the research. It's the thrill of the chase.
    LD : I have postcards sent by my great aunt in Rochdale to my great uncle some 30 miles away back in the early years of last century which were posted in the morning and delivered mid-afternoon.
    Betsy & John : Thanks for your comments

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  11. Alan! You're not loopy at all! Apparently no loops means 'independence'

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  12. Baino : That is good news indeed

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  13. thats the spirit! love the bends in your letters. nice flow to your script. sure it gave mrs chambers a smile.

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