Tuesday, April 23, 2013

A Mucky Postcard To Lady Luppell


I bought a mucky postcard on Sunday. It was dog-eared, and torn, and stained and cracked, but it was only 50p and that isn't much to pay for a bit of one hundred year old history. The picture is of the Stray in Harrogate which is an area of open parkland much traversed by generations of gentlefolk who had visited the Yorkshire Spa town to take the sulphurous waters. It will be a machine tinted illustration, but whoever mixed the colours seems to have captured the greyish-yellowish-bluish skies that so often are a feature of Yorkshire. Flipping the card over we can make out some of the message:

"The weather is perfectly delightful place very full and amusements still going on. We return Friday week boys go school - - How long are you staying ----"


It was sent to what looks like Lady Luppell who was staying at the Valley of Rocks Hotel in Lynton, Devon, a rather grand establishment which still exists. I have been able to find no trace of Lady Luppell : she seems to have passed through the world and left little record of her passing other than a mucky old 50 pence postcard.

17 comments:

  1. Great postcard find Alan.

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  2. Think what a record we all leave now thanks (or curses) to the internet.

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  3. I can see why you rescued it..it has a stamp and everything:)

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  4. That is indeed a special postcard. One thought, what if they aren't the letter p in her name? I know my mother's relatives sent mail with letters that were confusing. Just a thought.

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  5. Good bargain, Alan. It's a place I have spent many hours in but without the delightful weather experienced by the writer of the card.

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  6. Mucky and yucky but fun to see. History can be pretty much a bunch of dust and dirt but it has been around for a long time.

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  7. It might be just a ratty old postcard but it can make a very good story.

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  8. I think Karen may have a point, Alan. The two Ps in Luppell don't look much like the Ps in perfectly and place. But what else might they be?

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  9. I had to come back to see if anyone else thought the same about the letter. The p in perfectly is indeed much different Martin. Maybe it's a small k or a fancy large R ???

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  10. I think her name is Lady Trippel. From The Court Circular in The Times, Tuesday, Dec 02, 1913; pg. 11:
    "Lady Trippel, who has been very ill in Italy during the last 10 months, underwent a serious operation at Fitzroy House on Sunday morning. Her condition yesterday was grave but hopeful."

    In July 1911, Lady Trippel gave a silver trinket box as a wedding present to Sir Harry Waechter and Miss Josephine D'Arcy.

    An obituary in The Times on 31 March 1934 gives more:

    "Lady Trippel, widow of Sir Henry Trippel, who died in 1930, died at Hereford on Wednesday at the age of 74 of blood poisoning. She was Lillian, daughter of Major William Amphlett Moss, of Great Witchingham, Norfolk, and married in 1890 ..."

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  11. The 1911 Census shows the Trippel family living at Onslow Hall, Richmond Green, Surrey. Although her husband's name is shown as Francis here, I'm sure it's the same person. He was of Prussian origin, and a retired Army officer.

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  12. Henry Francis Trippel married Lillian Edith Moss in 1890. Their only daughter Dorothea Lillian A Trippel was born in 1891 and married Dr Herbert E Cumming in 1917.

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    1. Brett, you're a genius Thanks

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  13. Major Henry Francis Trippel of the Army Motor Reserve, and formerly an Army Tutor, received his knighthood from the King at Whitehall on 28 July 1909. Apparently Sir Francis was a genius at fundraising. Between 1908 and 1911, he raised "£300,000 for various causes and institutions ... Extorting money from millionaires is a hobby with this gentleman."

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  14. On the "mysterious Sir Francis Trippel," the following is from "The county families of the United Kingdom":

    TRIPPEL, Sir (Henry) Francis, Knfc.—Cr. 1909.

    b. 1866; m. 1890 Lillian Edith, dau. of Major
    William Amphlett-Moss. Sir Francis Trippel, who was educated at Real-Gymnasium, Duisburg, and at Bonn Univ., took a leading part in the promotion of the Union Jack Club, has published many articles on military education and physical training, originated and edited 'The Flag,' and is Major ret., late Army Motor Reserve and Hon. Secretary of King Edward VII. British-German Foundation. — Bath Club, w. ; R. Automobile Club, s.w.

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  15. Where would we be without Brett?

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  16. Georgina Malcolm1:33 PM

    Do we know why this park is called The Stray?

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