Saturday, April 27, 2013

Sepia Saturday 174 : One Small Step For Revie's Stars



The one advantage of taking photographs featuring people reading newspapers is that you have a good chance of dating them when you come to look through your collection of old photographs a lifetime or so later. That is particularly the case with our Sepia Saturday archive photograph this week : which features a group of readers discovering that man had finally reached the moon. That one small step for man back in July 1969 wasn't too far away (in time) from when my photograph was taken. I can't precisely pin down when Revie's stars grabbed revenge, but Don Revie was manager of Leeds United Football Club until 1974 and if they were playing Everton in what was then the First Division, it must have been the late 1960s or the early 1970s. My photographs features my father, Albert, catching up with the news. The name of the reporter writing about that Leeds v Everton match allows me to identify the newspaper - the Sunday People. The People was still a broadsheet when my photograph was taken so I need to try and track down when it changed to its current format of a tabloid. But at least I have been able to discover which newspaper it is; that's a start - just one small step for a man.

Take a look at what others are doing with out Sepia Saturday theme this week by following the links from the Sepia Saturday Blog

17 comments:

  1. A superior photo, Alan, and once again you and I are listening to the same wavelength.

    I don't think the people of the future will look back with nostalgia to the days when their iPad was only 1,024 × 768 pixels. The broadsheet was a real NEWSPAPER. You could hide behind it. Screen the sun and take a nap. Wrap up a bunch of roses. Swat flies and small boys. Rattle the pages and frighten the cat.

    Sometimes the digital age fails miserably to improve on old faithful analog devices.

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    1. Mike, I should have read your comment before finishing my post last night. I couldn't remember many of the things we used to do with newspapers, and here you've named them! Thanks for jogging my memory.

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    2. and don't forget starting fires.

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  2. Our local newspaper just switched to tabloid size. It's just not like a real newspaper anymore. I'm always so pleased to see family photographs of people doing common, everyday things. They are uncommon in my family album. Great photo. I love the antimacassar on the back of the couch.

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  3. I wrote on another Sepia participant's post that this week's theme prompted some professional musings on my part. As a reading specialist, I wonder about all the positive research connecting child reading habits with adult reading habits. It's so important for children to observe adults reading books, newspapers, etc. Will that be lost as we switch to digital literacy? Interesting... at any rate, a wonderful photo showing intense concentration. Love it!

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  4. Ever the detective, Alan. I really like the photograph of your dad. He looks quite engrossed.

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  5. I went with the more obvious part of the theme this week. Great photo though.

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  6. Norman Wynne's obituary states that he was "a sports reporter on the Daily Express and, for 25 years, the Sunday People in Manchester," but doesn't say when those years were. I can't quite read the date of the newspaper, but it looks to me like "September." The day is a single digit. Is the original any better?

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  7. Again and again you show how much can be found by looking carefully at a good photo.

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  8. Such a good photo of your father. Absolutely beautiful. I remember eating fish and chips out of newspaper....they always tasted better I'm sure.

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  9. Ooh and I think it used to hang in squares on a nail next to the loo but that was before I was born thank goodness.

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  10. Great photo, Alan. If only the Telegraph would go tabloid, it annoys me intensely with the bottom half of almost every page taken up my adverts. I remember using squares hanging from a hook!

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  11. I hate to admit that I don't read the paper anymore. I check in to www.news.com.au every day instead!

    Great photo.

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  12. Someday those photos will be collectors items and in the history books and kids will say what kind of antiques are those newspapers? :)

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  13. That's a lovely photo of your Dad, but he's sure to suffer from broadsheet-armache (as featured in my post this week). Despite the many uses listed by Mister Mike I still prefer my iPad version.

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  14. Great photo of your dad! I prefer the newspaper! Reading the morning paper is one of my favorite parts of the day. And Sunday - a heavenly thick paper with many more pages to peruse.

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  15. That is a FINE photograph. Excellent post.

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