Sunday, March 25, 2012

One Pin, Two Views 6 : Some Final Thoughts


Well I have thoroughly enjoyed myself this last week with the experiment Jennyfreckles and I have been carrying out. Our decision to independently visit the village of Thornton and photograph whatever took our eye has resulted in some fine images. It has also demonstrated that cameras are rather clever objects : when you point them at a subject, they not only take a photograph looking forwards, but also capture a reflection of our own personality and frame of reference. Looking back on the photographs Jenny has featured in the series, it is clear to see that she is a master of shape, colour and composition. Looking back at my own ..... well you can draw your own conclusions, but the fine old Yorkshire expression "maungy bugger" comes to mind.


I am finishing with a brace-and-a-half of images which I suppose sum up my Thornton experience. The first one features a broken old gas lamp on a mill waiting to be demolished. Down in the bottom of the valley there are a host of such buildings. mostly empty and disused. patiently waiting with what remains of their Yorkshire dignity to be converted into aspirational apartments.

When I spotted that second image of a closed and derelict post office I couldn't help thinking of the stonemason who carved the date above the windows in the belief that here was a building that would last the torrents of time. But it is perhaps the third image that encapsulates Thornton for me : the steep hills, the cobbled streets, the wonderful houses.


Finally, can I thank everyone who has followed this little experiment of ours, your comments have been an integral part of the process in the very best traditions of Blogging. And can I particularly thank Jennyfreckles - the Salt to my pepper, the Wise to my Morecambe. If Jenny agrees, I would like to suggest that we repeat the experiment next year and indeed make this an annual experiment which, along with the buildings of Thornton,  will last the torrents of time.

These posts are only half of the story. Visit Jenyyfreckles' excellent SALT AND LIGHT Blog to see how she has concluded the experiment.

26 comments:

  1. It's been thoroughly enjoyable, Alan. You mentioned layers in one of your posts, and you have applied your own. You have left your thoughts and perceptions to settle around Thornton, along with the countless others that have built to create the ambience of the place. You have captured the images, and left your feelings by way of a receipt.

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    1. That's poetic Martin - but I would expect nothing less from your digital pen.

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  2. It has indeed been enjoyable Alan. Thank you for allowing us to be observers.

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    1. No thanks necessary - after all, you conducted Isobel and I around your own island for real only a few short weeks ago.

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  3. Hi Alan .. I think I agree - and am rather partial to the expression "Maungy Bugger" .. I think I'll coin it for a Sussex term .. the Yorkshire freckled lass - I'll leave well alone!!

    They've been so interesting to see the differences you've both come up with .. and your approach to the project. I hope they rescue the fixtures and fittings from those mills - perhaps there are too many already. Now the poor Post Office - who'd have thought in Victorian times their buildings would be either out of date and too small, or too wonderful and are still revered.

    I love the folly - that's what it looks like - what a lovely place to live in .. once you'd got to the top ...

    Cheers Hilary

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    1. Hi Hilary, One of the great delights of this project is that it has put me in contact with some new bloggers - it will be a pleasure to keep up with them in the months to come. Thanks so much for your kind words.
      Regards, The Maungy Bugger

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  4. Thank you Alan and jennyfreckles for letting us come along, to see a place through different eyes. It was a wonderful experiment and one that bears repeating all over the world. Beauty is, indeed, in the eyes of the beholder.

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    1. Why thank you, Stranger. And I suspect I can speak for Jenny as well when I say the pleasure has been all ours.

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  5. A most enjoyable series of images, today's shots are great, I very much like the one you saved for last. Thanks for sharing your trip.

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    1. Lisa, Yes I must confess, I think it is my favourite too

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  6. First time visitor from Jenny's blog, now I need to catch up on this series from both you and her. What a cool experiment... I find it fascinating. ~Lili

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    1. It's a pleasure to have you as a visitor Lili. I hope you like the various images we have both featured over the last week

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  7. This was fun and I can't believe the fine experiment is already over with, but then there is next year to look forward to.

    When I first began blogging a little over a year ago, I thought there was little difference in how the English and Australians perceived things. However, now, I am beginning to notice subtle differences in our way of thinking and indeed perception. At present, my preferences lean toward the sensibility of the English.

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    1. Oh, that is an intriguing comment. I hope you will explain more - I will keep a careful eye on your Blog.

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  8. Interesting to see the different viewpoints; cafes and pubs. Like that third image above.

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    1. Yes, Hilary called it a folly, but I don't think it is. I just think it is typical Yorkshire, watching your brass and determined to make the most of what land you have without buying any more.

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  9. I'm late arriving today.... but here's something - I took an almost identical photo to your last, except mine had a parked car on it so I decided not to use it. The building is called Coffin End, for fairly obvious reasons. It used to be the Star Inn (and staged wrestling with bears, would you believe!) And the date stone of your second photo was the first photo I took when I arrived in Thornton. So although we came at it very differently and never met, in some senses we did meet, I feel, in a most satisfactory way. As to next year (or later this, even) - Yes, let's!

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    1. I am shocked to learn that there was a pub-that-was and I didn't recognise it. You are absolutely right, we walked together through Thornton and it was a thoroughly enjoyable walk. I am looking forward to the second part of the experiment already - I will be in touch.

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  10. It's been very interesting to see the contrast between yours and hers, although I'm still no wiser about what "maungy" means! I was really very struck by your second image, it's absolutely wonderful with those marvellous splashes of colour on the almost monochrome building. I'd be very pleased if I had taken that photo. I also like the others - both so typical in their own ways. I didn't know there were still derelict mills waiting to be restored, it's amazing there are any left!

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    1. "Maungy" is a lovely old Yorkshire expression and I can still remember being told off by my mother for looking maungy. I suppose a translation would be sad or miserable with a good dollop of spoilt brat added for effect.

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  11. Close to mangy?
    Congratulations on your wonderful project.
    Now you must share a beer together and compare notes....

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    1. Perhaps we will share a beer as we plan Part II.

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  12. It has been fun following you two through this challenge. I left a comment on Jenny's post which gives my view of your differences. I think you hit the nail on the head when you said a photo tells about the photographer as much as it does about the subject matter. The old Post Office building would look lovely restored and given a new lease on life with the date left intact for all to enjoy and wonder. Your last shot is getting close to Jenny's interpretation of Thornton. Between the two of you I see Thornton as an old town reeking in history untold. It looks run down and unloved in some areas. Some houses are neat and tidy with a spectacular view of the great Yorkshire countryside. It may be a difficult town to get around due to the steep hills.

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  13. I had coffee with Jenny on Saturday morning (whilst admiring her wonderful exhibition of photographs!) and she was rather expecting that it might become an annual event. I must say that I'm delighted. I love her photography and informative style, but I also love your wit and your flair for telling it how it is - the nuts and blots of Thornton!

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  14. I think your last photo is the one I will remember..stunning. Everyone sees things differently Alan..if we all viewed the world the same it would be really boring. I hope you do this again someday because I found it very interesting! Well done! :)

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  15. That's one skinny house! :)

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