Tuesday, January 02, 2007

Demand Curves, Accordions and the Pleasant Process of Discovery

One of the great things about downloading music is the freedom it gives you to experiment. When I bought my first LP, almost forty years ago, it took two weeks of hard saving to pull together the thirty shillings or so that it cost me. With a purchase of that scale you couldn't afford to experiment - you had to be pretty sure you would be happy with the end-product before you handed (what felt like) your life savings over the counter. I suppose it could be argued that you appreciated the end-product more because of the sacrifices you had made. But I have never been much of a one for sacrifices. With downloading, once you have paid your subscription you can download to your heart's content. If i could remember any of the economics I once taught, I could argue that the shape of the demand curve changes : but I can't, so I won't.

So I made this New Years' resolution to download something new each day and to experiment where possible. Two days in, the results are mixed. Yesterday was a disaster (rap is and surely will always be nothing more than an embarrassment). Today was a much better experience. The CD in question was "Confluences" by Jean-Louis Matinier which brings together the accordion of Matinier, the flute of Bobby Rangell, the guitar of Nelson Veras and the bass of Renaud Garcia-Fons. As the title suggests, it is a coming together of styles - ethnic, classical and very definitely jazz - producing a rich and memorable experience. Catch it if you can.



1 comment:

  1. I do not know who said: "A gentleman is a man who can play the accordion but doesn't" but I like it. However, I have to confess to a liking of Cajun accordion-playing and Garth Hudson of the Band is something of an expert, as it would seem is Annie Proulx, both of whom are in my book of influences.

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