Friday, April 16, 2010

Blue Sky Thinking


There are two things missing from the photograph of the morning sky I have just taken from my garden. The first is the familiar trails of airplanes criss-crossing the sky (as we are located just south of Leeds/Bradford International and just east of Manchester International the sky normally resembles a doodling pad). The reason is that practically all planes in Northern Europe have been grounded for the last 24 hours and look likely to remain grounded for the next 24.

The terrorist responsible for this disruption in world transport is a volcano in the Eyjafjallajoekull area of Iceland which is spewing out volcanic ash which can turn modern jet engines into useless pieces of scrap metal. The second thing missing from the photograph is any sign of the ash itself, although we are assured that it is up there waiting to strike the first 747 that dares to take it on. It is all very strange, like the beginning of a science fiction book. Indeed, both the Good Lady Wife and I were so reminded of the opening of John Wyndam's "Day Of The Triffids" last night that when The Lad invited us out to view the sunset, we both refused.

If we still exist as a species tomorrow I will be back with a Sepia Saturday post. In the meantime thank you for your feedback about blog load-speeds : the problem seems to be limited to Internet Explorer which many people shun anyway. I will try a few experiments to see if I can improve things : time for a little blue sky thinking.

21 comments:

  1. Just got through on "my" aircraft-tracking program - only 11 aircraft up in the whole of Europe.

    Day of the Triffid one of my favourite books of all time....

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  2. I must say, the news photos of the eruption are quite dramatic, I guess we now have to factor vulcanology into future travel plans.

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  3. Are you experiencing it there? I have a friend stuck in Oslo and apparently 6000 flights internationally are threatened. Let's hope for a high wind . .c'mon Britain, do your best, can of baked beans each and go for it!

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  4. pretty sure you will survive, but just in case....smiles. baino...lol. wonder if i can blow from here...

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  5. This reminds me of the cartoon character looking both ways before crossing the street, seeing it safe, puts a foot out and immediately gets flattened by oncoming traffic! Happy blue sky... -J

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  6. Hi Alan, I post this comment just prior to a visit this afternoon to Lancashire. Will signs of life be found there? (I am doubtful.....)

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  7. When I spent a summer in Kagoshima, Japan, years ago, I would wake up every morning with volcanic ash in my hair from Sakurajima. I hope it doesn't get that bad down in your neck of the woods!

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  8. That is interesting. The last time our skies looked like that was 9-11. Very strange not to see the criss cross patterns of the jets. At least you aren't having to wear face masks like the virus scars. ha.

    I've had trouble loading your blog, too...sometimes it would never load. Today was a bit slow, but it did get there!

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  9. Thank you for the concern expressed by my blogging friends throughout the world. With luck we might just survive, but it might help if people could send beer.
    Tony : There are NEVER any signs of life (as we know it) in Lancashire.

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  10. Will this affect the flavor of the beer?

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  11. Strange, indeed. My father lives in Aldeburgh, Suffolk. He's 82 and very spry, and worried about the possible affect on his garden.

    P.S. I could send you a case of Molson Canadian ... Oh, wait ... by freighter, it might take a while!

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  12. Roy : Dust affecting the beer - what an awful thought.
    Nana Jo : Just sent it anyway. If I survive I might need sustenance.

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  13. A beautiful sky, indeed. Such odd news about the volcanic ash. (Which is very clear, indeed!)
    It seems a lovely day to be outside in England. One day I plan on moving there. It's been a childhood dream to reside in the UK and being young and unattached I see no reason to follow that dream! Especially with skies that gorgeous

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  14. I'm glad to see that your sky is blue and clear of volcanic ash. Mostly though, I am amazed that both you and your wife have seen Day of the Triffids. in my youth, we had Day of the Triffids parties, but that's another story.
    P.S. Today my word verification is 'boller'. Sounds like a swearword to me.

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  15. P.S. (again) Might make for very good beer. In Bamberg, Germany they have Rauchbier...or smoked beer. Tastes a little like ham.

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  16. Yes, this is all very bizarre, and no doubt we'd have been hearing a lot more about it had there not been a conversation between three chaps on the TV last night.

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  17. My brother-in-law works at Southampton airport, and he's rubbing his hands with glee. One man's dust is another man's.....

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  18. Triffids! Ha! I call almost any strange-looking plant a "Triffid".

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  19. I had not realized how dangerous it was to planes until they dug up so old footage of the first time it happen. It shut all four engines downs and they fortunately coasted out of it and got two engines to restart. I commend you on the spelling of the E word. That doesn't seem real. Hang in there. The skies will clear.

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  20. Saw a wonderful cartoon yesterday. It said: "No Iceland. We said 'cash'."

    Perhaps we should enforce a 'no flights' week every month.

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  21. I'm with Chairman Bill in that I prefer the sky without vapor trails. But the volcano's effects do seem quite remarkable.

    Hope the beer is on the way!

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