Thursday, May 02, 2013

Sepia Saturday 175 : A Ciggie And A Breakdown In North Norfolk


Our Sepia Saturday theme this week features an archive image of a rather alarming vending machine which dispensed lit cigarettes! I can think of few things more frightening - other than making running repairs over a motorbike petrol tank with a ciggie hanging from your mouth.

There is a degree of serendipity about my choice of photograph for Sepia Saturday 175. That's my father there with the oily hands and that's .... errr ... someone else with the dangerously drooping dog-end. The description written on the back of the photograph is simply "King's Lynn" and therefore what we have is a ciggy and a breakdown in North Norfolk. My post is going up early because we are going away this weekend : first of all down to South London and then, on our way back north, we are spending a couple of days in North Norfolk. There will be no ciggies (the only dog-end will be dear Amy) and - hopefully - no breakdowns. There will, however, be some photographs which The Lad, when he is old and grey, can feature on Sepia Saturday 1798.

If you can't be bothered to wait until 2054, take a look at what everyone else is featuring for Sepia Saturday 175 by going to the Sepia Saturday Blog and following the links.

24 comments:

  1. Is that an AA patrol man helping you Dad out? Have a nice bank holiday !

    ReplyDelete
  2. Cars and bikes in those days; breakdowns were a 'sales benefit', why else did you have tools and handbooks?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wish I had a photo of a man who used to smoke a joint while on oxygen. Would have been perfect. Amazingly, he never blew himself up.

    ReplyDelete
  4. If you had a hand free in those days, it seems a cigarette was in order. Perfect photo for the prompt. Congratulations to your son!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks Alan. As a result of your post, I have just spent some time reading all about King's Lynn on Wikipedia. I feel it is important to add that there was at least one "smoke" house there. In connection with the fishing industry. Apparently a 'bloater' or a herring smoked whole was a bit of a treat. There...I've got that little bit of OCD out of my system now.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Alan ,enjoy Sarf London! I am old! I can remember AA Patrol Men on bikes that used to salute when my Dad (& his AA Badge ) passed by..cant remember if they were allowed to smoke tho....?I bet your Dad was pissed-off...he broke- down & some Bu**er whips out a camera & watches!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I can't imagine smoking over a motorcycle that contains petrol. Wasn't that dangerous? Couldn't he have blown himself and your father up? Or do I just not know the workings of a motorcycle?
    Great photo for the prompt.
    Have a wonderful trip.
    Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  8. I'm afraid I won't be around in 2054.

    ReplyDelete
  9. At least when a vehicle broke down back then, you could actually fix it. Now most vehicles are computerized, you have to take your auto to a garage and many $$$$$$ after, drive away, only to return in the not too distant future for another "fix". Have a grand time to you both Alan!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Well, in 2054 , I'll only be 115! I'm certain I'll be interested. On a more serious side , safety issues are much more publicized now than in the time of your photo.

    ReplyDelete
  11. In 2054 I'll be getting ready to celebrate my 103rd birthday. I hope you'll attend and bring a nice present.

    Your father looks too well-dressed to be standing by with oily hands.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm fascinated that a photograph was taken to "commemorate" the breakdown!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Your father seems to be in the middle of a story about the spanner and the roundabout. But who's holding the camera, Alan? Could there be a passenger on the pillion?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Yes, who is taking the photo? How fortunate or not they had a camera right handy to preserve for us today. 2054, well I'd be 110 and that might be just enough for me to accomplish my bucket list. I am glad to be back.

    ReplyDelete
  15. It's the kind of photograph that one usually stimulates a memory of the exact place and circumstances, who was there, what the weather was like, etc. etc. An excellent contribution, as always.

    ReplyDelete
  16. That's the very best sort of photograph. It's a candid moment in someone's life. Fine post.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Perhaps he was chain smoking. Great shot - where have the AA motorcyclists all gone?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Glad no one blew up! Great photograph!

    ReplyDelete
  19. I so remember those days, when my folks, especially my father always had to light up before solving something, or to begin driving the car or whatever! Like you couldn't do it without your buddy the cig!

    ReplyDelete
  20. A great photo from the family archives. I hunted for one one of my parents smoking but I wasn't successful but I found an old cigarette tin. I am adding my first post today.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Yes there are alot of things that were common place in the past, which are now considered/known to be dangerous. I look back on my childhood with wonder that I am still here with some of the things that we did.

    ReplyDelete
  22. How is it we all managed to survive our own stupidity? It's a wonder. Smoking next to a gas tank. Amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I had to go look at that photo..I wonder how that machine worked? Interesting.. as a former smoker I appreciated it! :)

    ReplyDelete
  24. AA is AAA here (pronounced Triple A) You wait at least an hour and feel like taking up smoking for sure. We all used to live a charmed life..... real candles on Christmas trees?!

    ReplyDelete