Tuesday, June 29, 2010

In Search Of Hebden Bridge's Electric Studios


I bought this fine Edwardian Cabinet Card the other day. At 50p (30c) it seemed a bargain, not only for the wonderful strong portrait, but also for the local connection.  Hebden Bridge is just up the valley from where I live - if some of my far-flung friends think the name sounds familiar it is where our blogging friend Tony Zimnoch lives. From what I can discover, C Westerman of the Electric and Daylight Studio's, Hebden Bridge, was a famous local photographer remembered not only for his own work, but also for the work of his apprentice, the woman who took over the studios in the 1920s, Alice Longstaff. When I checked the web before going on holiday I found a good few references to Alice Longstaff and a book that has been written about her. On my return, I have discovered that the pages are "no longer accessible". So it seems that I will have to abandon technology and get the bus up the valley and try and buy a copy of the book. I will check to see if the Electric Studios are still there and report back.

10 comments:

  1. interesting...and that they disappeared once found...hmmm...

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  2. Didn't Maggie's press secretary come from Hebden Bridge, forget his name now.

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  3. John : I have just spent five minutes wracking my brain and resisting the temptation to Google the answer. Finally got it - Bernard Ingham.

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  4. What an interesting post this morning Alan. I look forward to reading more from you. Wishing you a good day.

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  5. Very interesting, Alan. I did a bit of a Google and found some real basic stuff. There's a brief remembrance of her here, and then there's your link to the BBC4 article. It must be taking them some time to put the book Alice's Album together; I noticed the BBC4 mention of it was from 2004, but there's no trace of it otherwise. Good luck on your search; I pass the deerstalker and the meerschaum pipe on to you!

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  6. Hi Roy, Thanks for the link. As far as I know the book has been published - it's just that the site which was marketing it online has gone down. Thanks for the hat and pipe, I will try to put it to good use.

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  7. Nice cabinet card, Alan. I love the embossed logos at the bottom. It looks to be in pristine condition! We have some friends by the name of Westerman. Enjoy the sleuthing!

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  8. While on holiday five years ago Gem and I spent a gorgeous three days in Hebden Bridge. The name is what originally drew me to Tony's blog, too.

    The clarity of that cabinet card is remarkable. I wonder what the subject used to keep those curls on the top of his head in place? Or maybe they just happened.

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  9. Alan.I know nothing of this.Give Me A Bell when your planning a trip to Happy Valley !
    Did I tell you i nearly ran-over Bernard Ingham in my car once as he staggered out of The Albert pub!!???
    By all accounts ,He & Alister Campbell sit next to each at Burnley FC home games..........

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  10. O.K., all that other stuff is of interest too, but I'm just stuck on the hair - those three tsunami waves on top of his head. Could those have been on purpose? I would think they would have combed them down, unless he was actually outside and the wind was blowing.

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