Tuesday, November 17, 2015

A Pork Chop And A Stone Of King Edward Potatoes


This 1905 vintage postcard features a photograph of Halifax Borough Market taken from Southgate. Built between 1891 and 1896, the market dates from a time when Victorian civic pride was channeled by local corporations into the construction of ever-more imposing town halls and market halls. The intention of such buildings was not only to provide  a suitable location for conducting municipal business or for selling produce, but also to build something finer, grander and more imposing than that of any neighbouring West Yorkshire town. 

At the time of my old postcard, both the neighbouring communities of Bradford and Huddersfield had fine Victorian indoor markets. Both, however, fell victim to the demolition craze of the 1960s and 70s - only to be replaced with brick and concrete bunkers. Halifax Borough Market remains, still standing proud, still inviting citizens of the town through its doors to buy a pork chop or a stone of King Edward potatoes.



10 comments:

  1. I like those trees. What are they? Fastigiate oaks or something?

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    1. I must admit, I have no idea. The nest time I am passing the market I will take a look to see if there is a little name thingy attached to them.

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    2. But you must have taken your photo several weeks ago? It looks too green to be recent. Can you pick up a leaf maybe?

      Wow it is so windy this evening. There won't be any leaves left.

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  2. Just matching the exteriors and seeing the refurbished exterior is a grand sight.

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  3. Splendid! We saw a gruesome picture in Bradford when we went last September of Morecambe and Wise sitting on a bulldozer with a dolly bird, celebrating all the demolitions.
    The title of this post made me think of some kind of Billy Bunter feast!

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  4. Splendid! We saw a gruesome picture in Bradford when we went last September of Morecambe and Wise sitting on a bulldozer with a dolly bird, celebrating all the demolitions.
    The title of this post made me think of some kind of Billy Bunter feast!

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  5. So there are still some smart people left who know the value of maintaining and keeping older buildings.

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  6. It is so good that the markets and building still remain. I would love to visit to buy a pork chop and a stone of potatoes.

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  7. I don't like to shop but I think I would like to explore that market:) Those poor trees don't have much space for their roots:(

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  8. So good to compare the old and the contemporary view and find them essentially similar. As you say, so many old places got torn down in the interests of modernism.

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