Tuesday, July 08, 2014

And The Band Played On : Halifax in July 1914


FROM THE HALIFAX COURIER : 11 JULY 1914

TREAT TO HALIFAX WORKHOUSE INMATES
The mayor and Mayoress of Halifax are giving their annual treat to the inmates of the Workhouse on Wednesday, July 22. The gathering will be held at the Workhouse, and the Mayor has engaged King Cross band to play during the afternoon. Tea will be provided in the dining hall, and afterwards an entertainment will be given. Ald. Ingham will present the men with tobacco and the women and children with toffee. All Guardians are invited, and a number of private friends of the Mayor and the Mayoress.

HALIFAX UNION WORKHOUSE, WHICH WAS IN GIBBET STREET, WAS OPENED IN 1840 AND REMAINED ACTIVE UNTIL THE 1930s WHEN IT BECAME A HOSPITAL


IMPROVING RELATIONS WITH GERMANY
The "Kolnische Volks-Zeitung" (organ of the German Centre) in an interesting article on "Our relations with England" refers to the great improvement in British-German relations, and the possible causes and occurrences that may have led to it. It says : "One thing is certain, that the Ambassadors' Conference in London during the Balkan crisis has played a prominent part in the history of British-German understanding." With reference to this conference, a high tribute is paid to Sir Edward Grey, and to his great authority and tact. The visit of the English squadron to Kiel, besides testifying to these improved relations, the organ of the Centre continues, may also have a bearing on the continuation of good relations between the two peoples, insomuch as it will have convinced the British naval officers that the German Navy does not harbour any hostile intentions against England.

JUST 24 DAYS AFTER THE PUBLICATION OF THIS ARTICLE, ENGLAND AND GERMANY WERE AT WAR


CYCLING ACCIDENT
A serious accident befell Frank Higgins, a wire drawer, of 11 Back Albion Street, Brighouse, about 7.15 on Wednesday. He was cycling down Halifax Road and when nearing the bottom - the roadway is steep - he ran into a black retriever dog and was thrown from his machine. When picked up by Ernest Solomon he was found to be unconscious. The injured man was conveyed home and Dr. Farrar sent for. He recovered consciousness, but was suffering from slight concussion.

DR FARRAR HAD ROOMS ON LOWER BRIGGATE, BRIGHOUSE. MANY YEARS AFTER HIS RETIREMENT, HUMAN BONES WERE FOUND IN THE ATTIC OF HIS FORMER HOUSE.


SILK DRESSERS' STRIKE
Last night, a largely attended meeting of silk workers was held at the Labour Club, Brighouse, when it was reported that a strike had taken place at the Calder Bank and Belle Vue Mills of John Cheetham and Sons. Rather more than 100 silk dressers had ceased work against an alleged excessive amount of work which they were required to do in consequence of the recent advance of wages. The men contended that the amount of work which was expected of them was injurious to health and could not be done. The attitude taken up was supported by the meeting, and it was feared that unless some concessions are made by the various firms in the town a general strike will ensue in the near future. The present terms were only agreed to by the men after the last strike, a few months ago, under strong protest, and only after their leaders had strongly advised them to give them a trial.

SILK SPINNING BECAME A MAJOR INDUSTRY IN BRIGHOUSE DURING THE SECOND HALF OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY AND BY THE TURN OF THE CENTURY THERE WERE SEVEN SILK MILLS IN THE TOWN


9 comments:

  1. Beer drinkers will be aware that whether 'Whitaker's Shire Ales' or any other, beer and 'natural gas' do go together.

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  2. It's fascinating how daily life in July 1914 was collectively unconscious of the approaching calamity, very much like how weather forecasting used to be blind to storms. In August that will change, and street terror will have a new meaning.

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  3. an interesting selection of stories, the further story about Dr Farrar is intriguing.

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  4. Most enjoyed, especially with your footnotes to give more meaning to those published words. So great to have that 20-20 hindsight!

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  5. Wonderful old newspaper page. Back when I demonstrated spinning an old woman stopped to tell me about working in the silk mills, when she was young, "before the War." She demonstrated with her hands the many movements of reeling silk. Her children and grandchildren tried continually to drag her away, but I was a willing audience and she did not leave until she told her story.

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  6. Enjoyed the story of the cycling accident... and the further story about Dr. Farrar.

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  7. Ah Whitaker's Ales!Nostalgia in a Glass!

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  8. You tibits seem like olden day tweets to me

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  9. Human bones?? It was quite common for medical students to have real bits of skeleton - I remember medical students when I was studying music having a "half skeleton". People talked of them being imported from India. I wonder if this was the source of Dr Farrar's?

    it was considered cool in those days to use a cranium as an ashtray.The insensitivity of youth.

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