Saturday, July 02, 2011

Sepia Saturday 81 : Albert (A Welcome Destination)


I am still finding my metaphorical feet following my prolonged absence, and this Sepia Saturday submission reflects this. It was going to be my submission for Sepia Saturday 80 as that took place on the 25th June 2011 which was exactly 100 years after my father, Albert Burnett, was born. You may recall that the archive image last week showed a complicated piece of machinery, just the kind of thing my father, a mechanic, would have been at home with. But with all the things happening last week - such as getting The Lad ready for his African exploits - I never got round to posting the image. I did, however, remember to raise a glass in his memory.

Albert would not have been too surprised by this late submission as he always felt that I left things to the last minute and could never arrive places on time. And Albert would have approved of my priorities as he would always put his children first. This photograph must have been taken in the 1970s when he was probably about the same age as I am now. I feel myself growing into my father as the years go by (The Lad always leaves things until the last minute and can never arrive on time!) - a destination I am proud to travel to.

Albert has been dead just over eight years now and I still miss his calm good sense, his cheerful good humour and his love. He was a good man, a nice man. He was my father.

To see the other contributions to Sepia Saturday 81 go to the SEPIA SATURDAY BLOG

22 comments:

  1. Albert has a cheeky grin in this photo!Is that one of The Lakes behind him?

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  2. I am starting to look like my father as I remember him when he was on hos late 50s.

    Sometimes, when I get a bad echo on a phone line, I can hear what sounds like my brother talking to me.

    I don't recognise it, but others say my bother and I are very similar in mannerisms and speech (although totally different to look at).

    I'm now starting to do all the things my mother thought were disgusting in my father. Hay finds them disgusting too (as does my son, but he's going to start doing them when he gets into his late 50s).

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  3. Tony : I suspect it would have been a Scottish Loch.
    CB : As Larkin said : "They fill you with the faults they had, And add some extra, just for you".

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  4. A smashing tribute to your dad, Alan. My own father pushed off when I was 7, but I have fond memories of my step-father, who was also a decent man.

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  5. Great tribute to your father! I look a lot like my Dad, too, although he never had any facial hair, and I don't remember him developing jowls the way I have.

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  6. What a dapper looking gentleman. And a fine tribute.

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  7. It’s lovely picture in a picturesque setting. I’ve been waiting to find out what the connection was to the photo last week; thank goodness you’ve cleared up the mystery. That date was my son’s birthday too so I was in reminiscing mood as well. Looking at old photos of his babyhood and noting family resemblances. Since taking part in Sepia Saturday I have found myself doing this even more! Thank you Alan for your very kind words on my post this week, it means a lot to me.

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  8. 100 years ago - so your father was just 5 years older than my father, which makes... Never mind, let's not go into that.

    I like the sound of your father, very much.

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  9. My father was born in 1911 too.

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  10. That photo just makes me smile! Love the tribute to your dad. Sounds like a wonderful man!

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  11. That is a lovely tribute to your father. He sounds like an anchor in your life.

    I was wondering whether that is one of the Lakes too.

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  12. "I did, however, remember to raise a glass in his memory." Heh. Not to slight your father in the least, but I tend to think that you'd remember to do that for any occasion.

    My own father died in a multiple vehicle accident when I was not quite twelve. He was only 52, two years younger than I am now. It's a strange feeling.

    Here's a toast to your dad.

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  13. Hooray for good dads! I was lucky in mine too, and feel very sad for those who lost their fathers young or whose dads were absent or abusive. The stability of having a kind and steady father has run deep for me and sounds like it has for you too.

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  14. Cheers to your dad. Mine would have been 100 on June 13 this year and was also named Albert.

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  15. Bless and he's dressed like such a 'northerner'. Doesn't really matter how old our parents are when they leave us, the wrench is always hard.

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  16. Interesting to hear you say you find yourself growing into your dad these days. My hubby has been saying that about his dad more and more lately. I like the photo of your dad.

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  17. A fine toast to the old man. The mists make it almost a watercolor. A place that will probably stay timeless too.

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  18. Occasionally you can tell just by looking at a person that he is a smart and likable fellow. Such is the case with Albert.

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  19. I too couldn't help noticing the smile on Albert's face. No doubt his surroundings played a part in that!
    Thank you for following...

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  20. nice that you have such fond memories of him.
    :)~
    HUGZ

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  21. Excuse the mutilation of a perfectly good cliche, but just as we are fated to repeat the mistakes of our ancestors, there have to be just a few traits that are good to inherit! Great photo, Alan, and welcome back.

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  22. Welcome back Alan. Hope you and the GLW had a swell time on MY side of the world. I like the picture of your Dad, he seems very likable in this picture, I'm sure he was always.........

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